Myofascial Slings | What Are Myofascial Slings & Why Do They Matter?

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

The dynamic movement of our body results from superficial muscle activity resulting from different deep muscles cooperating with each other. Myofascial slings are also known as anatomy slings and have been linked very closely to superficial muscle activity. The term, anatomy slings, was first mentioned by Vleeming, while the term myofascial was described as a set of structures within a sling. To make it clear, anatomy slings aren’t just one type of tissues, they involve fascia, muscles, and ligaments that are interconnected with other and provide stability and mobility to the body. For this exact reason, it’s important to understand how fascia is connected with each other and helps the body to function.

Most of us don’t know but the force produced by a contraction in our muscles spread across its origin. The force is transferred to other structures within the myofascial sling, making it possible for the force to travel far from the original point of the muscle contraction. This is called the force vector. The muscles are interconnected within the myofascial sling via fasciae. For instance, the transfer of force within the pelvis and lumbar spine is one such example of how myofascial slings transfer force from the point of origin to other parts of the body.

For the optimal alignment of the bones, the force vectors need to be balanced as imbalanced vectors could cause a tension in the myofascial slings, leading to loss of stability and misalignment.

Our body is made up of many of these myofascial slings and it’s necessary that all of these slings are working harmoniously.  They help us move better and have more speed. There’s more you can find out about myofascial slings in the following video:

Share the article

Feel stronger.
Move better.
Think clearer.

Live a life with less limits

9 Middlemiss St, North Sydney NSW 2060
1300 731 733   info@physioinq.com.au